Skip to main content

About your Search

20120926
20121004
STATION
CSPAN 5
MSNBCW 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
MSNBC 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
on cell phone camera. 84-year-old urs la nixon lost control of her car on friday, and some good samaritans braved the cold waters to pull her out. police say nixon sped through a stop sign, two fences and an oceanfront barrier before she ended up in the portland harbor. she's in fair condition. several of her rescuers were treated for hypothermia. >>> a 10-year-old boy in philadelphia is in big trouble. see that white van crashing into those cars right there. police say on sunday he stole it and he's the one behind the wheel. surveillance camera shows him getting out and trying to run away, but someone stops him. police say the boy saw the keys on the rear door and went on a brief joyride. he wasn't just slapped on the wrist either. he's expected to be charged with auto theft. >>> in hong kong, a deadly ferry collision. a boat filled with revelers slammed into the ferry. more than 100 people were injured and sent to hospitals. report say the ferry captain was afraid to stop, so he safely returned to port. >>> in california, at least 20 passengers were injured when an amtrak train collided
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
president richard nixon had recently gotten over a bout with an infection that left him looking shaky. kennedy looked healthy and strong. when kennedy won nearly half said the debate played a role in the decision. al gore was criticized for sighing and rolling his eyes while debating george bush in 2000. and then capped it off with this moment. >> it is not what your philosophy and position on issues but can you get things done. and i believe i can. >> that's funny. i'm sorry. you hear this next one repeated many times. it came from ronald reagan during his debate with jimmy carter. reagan posed a simple question. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> four years later president reagan was 73 facing concerns about his age, an issue compounded by his shaky first debate and then turned the weakness into a strength with this line. >> i want you to know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> bill clinton was on the other side of that equation while debating another 7
, it happened. kennedy, nixon. >> i got $5. >> the rest of us got a tradition. an evolving tradition praised and criticized over the last 52 years. >> what about you? do you think debates are good now or bad? >> i don't know. mr. cann is a good reminder, often the americans who make democracy better are the americans who don't take democracy for granted. gary, 9news. >> i give the debates two thumbs up. i think it's important to know what our candidates think and put them on the spot here. now tonight, i am here at u.s.a. today's newsroom where our live coverage gins tonight at 9:00. you can catch the debate on our website. of course you can join us for a wrap up of the debate tonight at 11:00. and topper shutt has the story on what the weather is looking like out there. top. >> first of all, talk about fall colors. we're looking at near peek as you go on the other side of the divide past cumberland, over toward oakland. some good color showing toward i-81. wait a couple of weeks. some color, but south and east, no color at all. all right, next three days, code green, getting better an b
debates. john kennedy and richard nixon how nixon loft because he didn't wear make up and looked like he didn't shave. they thought he was dark and smarmy. turns out they were right, he was. >> whether was the al gore sigh, over and over again. [ sighs ] >> exactly. before that debate, al gore was five points ahead of george burke, after the sigh, he stalled out and george bush still lost that election, but he closed in close enough for the supreme court to make the call at home plate. but, my favorite, the absolute best debate moment of all lloyd benson, 1988 versus dan quayle. >> i have as much experience in the congress as jack kennedy did when he got the presidency. >> senator i served with jack kennedy. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. [ cheers and applause ] >> that was really uncalled for senator. >> you're the one that was making the comparison, senator. >> oh, smack! >> i love that! >> and there's one more. let's keep them on a high note. there's one more not from a general election debate but from a primary just last year
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
september leads can evaporate by election day. hubert humphrey was down 15 points to richard nixon. nixon won by less than 1%. jimmy carter had a lead over gerald ford. after three debates ford cut the lead to five points and led in the final gallup poll and narrowly lost. the final presidential debate changed everything leading to a regan landslide. >> with polls now showing president obama building a lead over mitt romney in key battleground states a democratic pollster and consultant who worked for jimmy carter says finding the right sample to survey can be tricky. >> we know from the exit polls and others is that republicans tend to respond to the polls less than often times particularly from news organizations less than do democrats. >> reporter: in 1988, george bush managed a huge swing. gallup had michael dukakis leading by 17 points after the convention. the loss to bush by 7%. a former are clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african american, latino and young people vote in 2
. >> a history of modern presidential debates. the first one was in 1960, kennedy-nixon. then there was a hiatus until 1976, when gerald ford agreed to debate jimmy carter. the debate commission was established in 1987. jim lehrer, tonight's moderator, has moderated the most debates over those years, 12 altogether. you have gotten criticisms about a moderator 6 -- selection, that they are mainstream media, all white, and middle-age or older. what is the response to that? >> we would state it slightly differently. we would say we have picked four exceptional journalists to have a lot of experience in doing presidential debates and covering politics in the white house and in foreign policy. we think they are also four individuals who have proven it is not about them. we do not want moderator's here trying to put themselves ahead of what the candidates have to say. at the end of the day, the american people want to hear from the candidates. one thing jim lehrer has demonstrated is that he is the type of moderator who lets the candidates do the talking. he will ask the questions, they will be pointe
since richard nixon. paul ryan is telling local cincinnati news it is okay because the money creates jobs but there's little evidence that it does anything for job creation. politico is pointing out some sketchy budget math. in paul ryan's plan. he quietly cut half a percent from medicare's annual growth rate and while that doesn't sound like much, without that money, the house budget plan would be in the red. back with more bill. stay with us. (vo) what is said here could decide the election. current tv presents coverage of the presidential debate. with unrivaled analysis and commentary. >> you're going to hear that used as a major talking point. (vo) the only network with real-time reaction straight from the campaigns and from viewers like you. >>now that's politically direct. sir... excuse me, excuse me... can i get you to sign off on the johnson case... ♪ we built this city! ♪ don't let food hang around. ♪ on rock & roll! ♪ [ orbit trumpet plays ] clean it up with orbit! [ ding! ] fabulous! for a good clean feeling... eat. dri
of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and
it was a game changer when president kennedy debated richard nixon. same was true with ronald reagan when he debated jimmy carter. it can make a difference. mitt romney needs to come out and be very aggressive about the president's policies and his solutions. and i think he will do real good. >> we know they've been rehearsing zingers or we're told by a "new york times" report this morning that mitt romney has been practicing zingers. i guess practicing them on some of his aides as well. you just talked about substance. others have been focusing on, well, really it's the moments and the zingers that make the difference. which do you think it is? >> there has to be a sense throughout -- at the end of the debate, the viewer will have a sense as to who can be the better leader for the united states. and mitt romney has to come across as, well, he can do a better job leading the united states on domestic policies. so it's an impression that the viewer will get overall. it will be the zingers. but it will be really the impression. who can create the better impression of leadership and that person
political era for getting people like joe mccarthy and richard nixon. talk about the media establishment's view of eisenhower. >> the media establishment basically loved eisenhower. he was their friend. you read his private correspondence. he and the publisher of "time" were great buddies. a lot of time people working in the white house -- it was such a different age. it was not as adversarial. it was much more trusting. correspondents would come out over to the white house, have a few drinks a s with ike. he'd say stuff off the record. he even talked about recognizing china. imagine if that had leaked during the 1950s. it was just a different era. and ike was trustworthy. reporters also trusted him. >> also talk about ike the republican president that was willing to send troops to little rock. >> you know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegregated the armed services. it wasn't truman. he appointed all the federa
, and as a student of history, this campaign is a lot like the 1960 race between kennedy and nixon. it is like the campaigns in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year v
nixon. it's not balanced at all. after the shows are over, with the republican speaker that was just the white only lying. when you ask the house why they let them do it they say it's the only way they can get them on tv. you guys put up "the washington times." start with "the national enquirer." with all downhill from there. it's not exactly a newspaper. the media coverage got to be where they tell these people anything. that's all i have to say. host: up next, an independent from ohio. you are on c-span. first of all, are you a true independent? have you made a pure mind yet? -- your mind yet. caller: yes. i'm strictly for obama. romney, just like the previous caller said, he is nothing but strait lies. i'm going to be frank with you. i think half the country morons, illiterate, and flat out stupid. i pray for the country. the citizenry is dumb. they are flat out stupid. host: chances are we're going to get a response to that comment. caller: i hope so. maybe it will wait some of them up and have them read something and trying to understand. over half the country i think it's flat
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)